• NAH FAIR SHIRT

    $20

    SIZE
  • NAH FAIR TOTE

    $12

  • FUTURE PRO-SITU CHICANX GRAFF

    $5


    under the influence of the Situationist International, Mexican aphorisms, aggressive L.A. architecture, anti-politics, rasquache, the erasure of local history, Chicano identity and hearing dumb opinions on L.A. ...one of us decided to give back some heat with these pithy declarations

  • CALENDAR

    $12


    A collectively sourced, designed, printed and packaged calendar of Los Angeles history that we care about that is sometimes radical, often historical, sometimes pop but sure to be a conversation piece.

  • L.A. 92 ZINE

    $5


    This classic essay, put out by the UK-based Aufheben in 1992, gives a multilayered understanding of the '92 LA riots. Broken down into six sections, this essay discusses various components of capitalist social relations and their effects leading up to, during, and after the riots occurred. The beating of Rodney King may have been the last spark that ignited the fire, but as the essay explains, it was only one aspect amongst many socioeconomic conditions that led to the '92 rebellion. Included are the larger race and class considerations particularly shedding light onto the internationalization of LA’s economy and immigration patterns. Aufheben also critiques the architectural shifts postmodernity brought forth as a way to further restrict people from living, interacting, and existing outside of the work/consume dynamic, as well as the increase in militarization of public space that came out of this shift in urban planning. Additionally discussed are the ways in which capital restructures itself and throughout various points in its history of development; the reincorporation of LA's proletarian uprising into a more efficient use of labor-power by capital; and lastly a look into LA’s gang culture, impact, and future potential. The essay emphasizes that despite these larger capitalist structures in place, disenfranchised communities such as LA’s continue to hold antagonistic power and will rightfully rebel to reappropriate what what capital excludes from them. This version includes annotations by LA ONDA.

  • HOW TO STOP A WOUND
    FROM BLEEDING ZINE

    $5


    A read on capitalist logistics and anarchist/communist counterlogistics. Each day the Alameda Corridor carries and distributes $250 million worth of exploited domestic and international surplus-labor in the form of material commodities to the rest of the country. This "bleeding wound" cuts through many of our Los Angeles working-class POC communities that ironically have been decimated economically due to the offshoring of jobs and industries to cheaper labor markets in the ever expanding capitalist desire to valorize. Largely unseen, as is the logic of the capitalist mode of production itself, the underground corridor hides the expropriated labor and the mechanizations of a globalized society based on commodity production and the extraction of surplus value. We need to understand the hidden abode of commodity capital’s circulation to not only understand capitalism today, but also in order to theorize the disruption of commodity capital’s circulation, the lifeblood which keeps capitalism alive and thriving. Capitalist logistics infrastructure, such as the Alameda Corridor, secures, routinizes, and systematizes our exploitation as the concealed, generic, conduit between our production and our consumption. When flesh is cut and wounded, the body naturally responds instinctively to clot and stop the loss of blood. How do we then deal with a wound that is killing us and our communities? In what ways have we tried to stop capitalist logistics in the past and what can we learn from those attempts in order to know how to stop this wound from bleeding?